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MMS book club

Good day, dear readers!

2022 rolled in a little too quickly and brought some nasty weather along with it! I am not sure what the weather is like where you are, but we got a huge snow dump and then lost power for several days. While it is nice to dream about living “in the old days,” I can say that reading by candlelight or the fireplace is NOT as exciting as it is made out to be!

We are currently reading “I Was Anastasia” by Ariel Lawhon, and so far, I am intrigued! I am hoping ya’ll are enjoying it as much as I am. February is going to be creeping around the corner soon enough, and our next book is going to shoot us right into another adventure. “The Pale Horseman” by Bernard Cornwell is the second book in the Saxon series. We read the first one over a year ago, and with so many fabulous books, we are finally making it back for book two! I mean, we all love Vikings, right?

Happy reading!

The Pale Horseman: Goodreads blurb

It is the lowest time for the Saxons. Defeated comprehensively by the Vikings who now occupy most of England, Alfred and his very small group of surviving followers retreat to the trackless marshlands of Somerset. There, forced to move restlessly to escape betrayal or detection, using the marsh mists for cover, they travel by small boats from one island refuge to another, hoping that they can regroup and find some more strength and support. Only Uhtred remains resolute. Determined to discover the enemy’s strategies, he draws once again on his Viking upbringing, and attempts to enter the Viking camps. His plan is to become accepted by their leaders, and to sit in their councils and uncover their plans. But once there, the attractions of his many friends among the Vikings coupled with his disillusion with the Saxons’ leadership and anger at Alfred’s criticism of his own conduct, draws him back again to his allegiance to the Vikings. The Pale Horseman, an even more powerful and dramatic book than The Last Kingdom, brings both Uhtred and the Saxons’ dilemmas vividly to life.

Pale Horseman

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